Films

Business Films

When it comes to the hustle and bustle of Wall Street, a good old rags to riches story, the fascination of private companies and their daily function, the economics of different currencies, and the dream of being the next great entrepreneur in the risky world of business, even Hollywood can't stay away. That's great for movie goers, though, as some of the best films are about life in the business world.

What are the best movies about business? These are! Wall Street, Risky Business, The Wolf of Wall Street, Moneyball, Ocean’s Eleven, Herb and Dorothy, The Secret of My Success, and The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit. Vote up your favorite business film and vote down the movies that should have declared bankruptcy. And, if your favorite isn't on the list, add it!

Corporate centers around the power games between two industrialists, The Sehgal Group of Industries (SGI) owned by Vinay Sehgal (Rajat Kapoor) and the Marwah Group of Industries (MGI) owned by Dharmesh Marwah (Raj Babbar). The two companies are traditional rivals in the food & beverages products business. Bipasha Basu plays Nishigandha Dasgupta aka Nishi, vice president of SGI, while Vinay Sehgal's brother-in-law Ritesh (Kay Kay Menon) joins in later as senior vice president.

Sehgal had promised Ritesh that Nishi would be released by the Enquiry Commission soon but after the compromise he abandons her. Ritesh, angry about it, threatens to expose Sehgal in front of the media if Nishi is not released within 48 hours. The next day he is found dead, having fallen from the terrace of his apartment building. It is assumed to be suicide but some think otherwise. A few days later, SGI's product is back on the market. In the new elections Gulabrao becomes the Chief Minister. The movie ends with Nishi shown fighting the case. She also has a daughter fathered by Ritesh.

Commercial Film

Biopic scholars include George F. Custen of the College of Staten Island and Dennis P. Bingham of Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis. Custen, in Bio/Pics: How Hollywood Constructed Public History (1992), regards the genre as having died with the Hollywood studio era, and in particular, Darryl F. Zanuck. On the other hand, Bingham's 2010 study Whose Lives Are They Anyway? The Biopic as Contemporary Film Genre shows how it perpetuates as a codified genre using many of the same tropes used in the studio era that has followed a similar trajectory as that shown by Rick Altman in his study, Film/Genre.

Bingham also addresses the male biopic and the female biopic as distinct genres from each other, the former generally dealing with great accomplishments, the latter generally dealing with female victimization. Ellen Cheshire's Bio-Pics: a life in pictures (2014) examines UK/US films from the 1990s and 2000s. Each chapter reviews key films linked by profession and concludes with further viewing list. Christopher Robé has also written on the gender norms that underlie the biopic in his article, "Taking Hollywood Back" in the 2009 issue of Cinema Journal. Roger Ebert defended The Hurricane and distortions in biographical films in general, stating "those who seek the truth about a man from the film of his life might as well seek it from his loving grandmother. ... The Hurricane is not a documentary but a parable."

Some biopics purposely stretch the truth. Confessions of a Dangerous Mind was based on game show host Chuck Barris' widely debunked yet popular memoir of the same name, in which he claimed to be a CIA agent.

Kafka incorporated both the life of author Franz Kafka and the surreal aspects of his fiction.[citation needed] The Errol Flynn film They Died with Their Boots On tells the story of Custer but is highly romanticized.

Casting can be controversial for biographical films. Casting is often a balance between similarity in looks and ability to portray the characteristics of the person. Anthony Hopkins felt that he should not have played Richard Nixon in Nixon because of a lack of resemblance between the two.

Ornare. Ornare natoque faucibus hymenaeos cras, purus lectus varius fringilla mattis sapien. Semper neque netus vitae pede at nunc. Lorem. Dui nunc non curae;, platea. Mauris volutpat ridiculus quam. Quisque arcu lorem auctor nullam hymenaeos

Genghis Khan in The Conqueror was objected to because of the American Wayne being cast as the Mongol warlord. Egyptian critics criticized the casting of Louis Gossett, Jr., an African American actor, as Egyptian president Anwar Sadat in the 1982 TV miniseries Sadat. Also, some objected to the casting of Jennifer Lopez in Selena because she is a New York City native of Puerto Rican descent while Selena was Mexican-American.

Abe Lincoln (Raymond Massey) leaves home for the first time, having been hired along with two of his friends by Denton Offut (Harlan Briggs) to take a load of pigs by water to New Orleans. When the boat gets stuck at a dam at the settlement of New Salem, Abe first sees and loses his heart to Ann Rutledge (Mary Howard), the beautiful daughter of the local tavern keeper. Thus, when Denton later offers him a job at the store he has decided to set up in New Salem, Abe readily accepts.

Abe discovers however that Ann already has a beau. Nonetheless, he settles in, making himself the most popular man around with his ready, good-natured humor, and taking lessons from schoolteacher Mentor Graham (Louis Jean Heydt). When his rival for Ann's affections leaves to better himself, Ann waits for him two years before receiving a letter from him in which he states he does not know when he will return.

Abe seizes the opportunity to express his love for her; she is unsure of her feelings for him and asks for a little time. Alas, she dies soon after of "brain fever", telling Abe on her deathbed that she could have loved him.

Abe is asked to run for the State Assembly. He reluctantly accepts and wins, but after his first term in Springfield, Illinois, he decides to study the law instead. When Mary Todd (Ruth Gordon) visits her sister Elizabeth Edwards (Dorothy Tree) and her wealthy, influential husband Ninian (Harvey Stephens), a party is held in her honor. All the eligible bachelors show up, including Abe's fiercest political rival, Stephen Douglas (Gene Lockhart)